The Queen’s English Indeed

Posted on November 1, 2012

3


Just say what you mean.

It’s hard enough trying to keep up and understand the text “shorthand” that comes along with text messaging my grown kids, but then there’s the verbal jargon that comes into play with ordinary conversations. At the risk of falling behind with the modern jargon that filters its way to me, I have found that far too often I blurt out expressions that are stale and annoying. Here’s a list of phrases and words that get under my skin, (like a “B” movie that you still have to watch ’til the end even though it’s ridiculously bad), and yet they still find a place in my conversations:

How many of these expressions do you find yourself using regularly?:

  • Go figure (what exactly?)
  • No worries (were you worrying?)
  • Whatever (No … tell me how you really feel.)
  • Get a life! (sometimes accompanied with a whack in the head)
  • It’s all good (actually, sometimes it’s not)
  • Get outta here! (I think I need some time alone)
  • For real? (No, stupid, I’m just teasing you)
  • That’s how the ball bounces (No kidding)
  • Bite me! (are you sure?)
  • Like you know (maybe I don’t)
  • Suck it up Buttercup! (only if I’ve changed my name)
  • Give your head a shake (happy to oblige you if you need a hand)
  • It’s showtime! (just lead me to the stage)

(and two of my favourites):

  • Think outside the box (is that like thinking outside my skull?)
  • It’s a no brainer (my brain has left the box temporarily)

Apparently, the short and the long of it is that it’s so awesome that I explain myself in this epic way that it’s easier to see the big picture of things. But don’t take my word for it. Ever since I told my friend that the cheque was in the mail, and she said okey dokey, it’s been a win-win situation. You know, I used to not go there, but whatever. Glad we touched base on all this stupid lingo. I’ve had an awesome time with it you know. I’m just sayin’ that you can take it or leave it; it’s just my 2 cents worth !

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Posted in: Gimme a Sign